Upcoming Events

To submit new events to this listing please login or email jensmith@cs.wisc.edu.

Calendar View

  • Monday, January 23, 2017 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    Prof. Han Liu
    Princeton University

    Abstract: We introduce two approaches to graphical modeling for continuous and mixed data, using semi-parametric techniques that make weak assumptions compared with the default Gaussian graphical model. One approach is through semi-parametric extension of the Gaussian graphical model. Another approach is through semi-parametric extension of the exponential family graphical model. Both approaches can be viewed as adding structural regularization to a generic pairwise non-parametric Markov random field model. To fit these models, we will introduce a unified regularized rank-based estimation... Read More

  • Wednesday, January 25, 2017 -
    3:30pm to 4:00pm
    1240 CS
    Wyatt Lloyd
    USC

    Scalable storage systems, where data is sharded across many machines, are necessary to support web services whose data is too large for a single machine to handle. A tension exists between the guarantees the storage systems provide and their performance. Stronger guarantees make it easier to build consistent web services on top of the data store but tend to be associated with worse performance, such as higher latency and lower throughput. My students and I are building systems that demonstrate new combinations of guarantees and performance are achievable, while also proving that some... Read More

  • Thursday, January 26, 2017 -
    8:00am to 12:00pm
    CS Lobby (near main elevators)
  • Monday, January 30, 2017 -
    1:00pm to 5:00pm
    1240 Computer Sciences

    PHD qualifying exam Registration with graduate coordinator in 5381 Computer Sciences between December 12 until January 19 at 4pm.

  • Monday, January 30, 2017 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    Austin Benson
    Stanford University

    Title:
    Tools for higher-order network analysis

    Abstract:
    Networks are a fundamental model of complex systems in biology, neuroscience, engineering, and social science. Networks are typically described by lower-order connectivity patterns that are captured at the level of individual nodes and edges. However, higher-order connectivity patterns captured by small subgraphs, or network motifs, describe the fundamental structures that control and mediate the behavior of many complex systems. In this talk, I will discuss several higher-order analyses based on higher-order... Read More

  • Wednesday, February 1, 2017 -
    9:00am to 4:00pm
    CS Lobby (near main elevators)
  • Wednesday, February 1, 2017 -
    10:00am to 3:00pm
    CS Lobby (near main elevators)
  • Wednesday, February 1, 2017 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    1240 Computer Sciences
    tba
    Bloomberg

    tba

  • Friday, February 3, 2017 -
    2:30pm to 3:30pm
    CS 1240
    Dr. Aniket Kate
    Purdue University

    Title : IOweYou Credit Networks: Not all permissionless payment
    solutions require a blockchain

    Abstract: IOweYou (IOU) credit networks model transitive trust (or
    credit) between users in a decentralized environment. They have recently
    seen a rapid increase of popularity due to their flexible-yet-scalable
    design and robustness against intrusion. They serve today as a backbone
    of real-world permission-less payment settlement networks (e.g., Ripple
    and Stellar) as well as several other weak-identity systems such as
    spam-resistant communication... Read More

  • Wednesday, February 8, 2017 -
    10:00am to 11:30am
    CS Lobby (near main elevators)
  • Monday, February 13, 2017 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    Joshua San Miguel
    University of Toronto

    TBA

  • Thursday, February 16, 2017 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    Alexis Hiniker
    University of Washington

    TBA

  • Monday, February 27, 2017 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    Panda Aurojit
    UC-Berkeley

    TBA