Upcoming Events

To submit new events to this listing please login or email jensmith@cs.wisc.edu.

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  • Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    Srinath Sridharan
    UW-Madison

    Committee: Professor Gurindar Sohi (advisor)
    Professor David Wood
    Professor Mike Swift
    Professor Remzi Arpaci-Dusseau
    Professor Mikko Lipasti

  • Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Andrew Bernat
    Pure Storage

    The storage industry is currently in the midst of a flash revolution. Today's smartphones, cameras, and many laptops all use flash storage, but the $30 billion a year enterprise storage market is still dominated by spinning disk. Flash has large advantages in speed and power consumption, but its disadvantages (price, limited overwrites, large erase block size) have prevented it from being a drop-in replacement for disk in a storage array.

  • Friday, September 26, 2014 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
    Fatemah Panahi
    UW-Madison

    Committee: Professor Jeffrey Naughton (Advisor)
    Professor AnHai Doan
    Professor Bilge Mutlu

  • Tuesday, September 30, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Mark D. Hill
    UW-Madison

    The University of Wisconsin–Madison Computer Sciences Department was founded in July of 1964. On the occasion of our 50th anniversary, we look to the past with pride, and also take the opportunity to assess the present and chart a course for the future. Our plans include three important changes in the ways we execute our core mission.

  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 - 5:45pm to 6:45pm
    Dr. Hany Farid
    Department of Computer Science, Dartmouth College

    From the tabloid magazines to main-stream media outlets, political campaigns, courtrooms, and the photo hoaxes that land in our email, doctored photographs are appearing with a growing frequency and sophistication. The resulting lack of trust is impacting law enforcement, national security, the media, e-commerce, and more. The field of photo forensics has emerged to help return some trust in photography. Most forms of photo manipulation will disturb some statistical, geometric, or physical property of an image.

  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 - 5:45pm to 6:45pm
    Hany Farid
    Dartmouth College, Department of Computer Science

    Photo Forensics: From tabloid magazines to mainstream media outlets, political campaigns, courtrooms, and photo hoaxes that land in our email, doctored photographs are appearing with a growing frequency and sophistication. The resulting lack of trust is impacting law enforcement, national security, the media, e-commerce, and more. The field of photo forensics has emerged to help return some trust in photography. Most forms of photo manipulation will disturb some statistical, geometric or physical property of an image.

  • Tuesday, October 7, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Michael L. Scott
    University of Rochester

    (Joint work with Konstantinos Menychtas and Kai Shen)

    With GPUs and other computational accelerators assuming an increasing
    share of the workload on modern machines, we argue that the operating
    system must assume responsibility for accelerator scheduling and
    resource management. This goal is particularly challenging on systems
    that allow user-level applications to interact directly with the device.

  • Thursday, October 9, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Henrik Christensen
    Georgia Tech

    TBA

  • Monday, October 13, 2014 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm
    Constance Steinkuehler & Kurt Squire
    University of Wisconsin–Madison

    TBA

  • Tuesday, October 14, 2014 - 4:00pm
    Abhishek Bhattacharjee
    Rutgers University

    TBA

  • Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
    Gillian Hayes
    University of California, Irvine

    TBA

  • Thursday, October 16, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Gregory Abowd
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    TBA

  • Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Mary Czerwinski
    Microsoft Research
  • Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Mark D. Hill & David Wood
    University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are being re-purposed to perform general-purpose computations as they offer the potential for better performance and and lower energy than conventional CPUs for some workloads. Effective use of GPGPUs, however often requires the programmer and/or runtime software to explicitly manage the logical name (address) and/or physical location of data. It is our hypothesis--shared by some--that GPGPUs can be made more generally effective if all CPU-GPU program threads can access data via a uniform virtual address backed by hardware data movement support.

  • Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    tba
    VMWare

    tba

  • Tuesday, November 4, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Matthew Watkins
    Bucknell University

    TBA

  • Wednesday, November 26, 2014 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
    TBA
    Maxeler

    Dataflow Programming Model Talk

  • Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
    Ben Bederson
    University of Maryland, College Park

    TBA.