Upcoming Events

To submit new events to this listing please login or email kbarrettwilt@cs.wisc.edu.

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  • Repeats every month on October, November on the third Wednesday 2 times.
    Wednesday, October 17, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    , Wednesday, November 21, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    CS 2310
    WACM

    The perfect gathering for all WACM members and Women in Tech to stay in touch, exchange updates about the advances in the relevant field and most of all meet people with similar goals and aspirations. Each cycle we choose a different theme or a topic for the day and use the luncheons as a way to let off some steam and go back to our schedules re-energized, fresh and inspired.

    Note: This is no longer a 'bring your own food'. There will be free food ordered by the bi-weekly chairs! Microsoft is generously sponsoring the bi-weekly luncheons this semester.

  • Tuesday, October 23, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:00pm
    Computer Sciences building, Room 1240
    Theodoros Rekatsinas and Loris D'Antoni

    You are invited to attend a presentation and informal chat with Professors Theodoros Rekatsinas and Loris D'Antoni (Computer Sciences) on October 23rd from 12:10PM - 1:00PM in CS 1240. Join us for pizza as you hear about what they teach and the research they do with the Department of Computer Sciences. This will be followed by a question and answer session about the topics they teach/research, general questions about the CS major and job potential, what is hot/not in the area of Computer Sciences, or any other general advice they can give.

    Space is limited so be sure to reserve... Read More

  • Thursday, October 25, 2018 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    Polina Golland, PhD
    MIT Electrical Engr and Computer Science

    Abstract: We present an algorithm for creating high resolution anatomically plausible images that are consistent with acquired clinical brain MRI scans with large inter-slice spacing. Although large databases of clinical images contain a wealth of information, medical acquisition constraints result in sparse scans that miss much of the anatomy. These characteristics often render computational analysis impractical as standard processing algorithms tend to fail when applied to such images. Our goal is to enable application of existing algorithms that were originally developed for high... Read More

  • Friday, October 26, 2018 -
    9:45am to 10:45am
    Fluno Center Auditorium, 601 University Avenue
    Noemi Elhadad
    Associate Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University

    Despite the impressive past and recent advances in medical sciences, there are still a host of chronic conditions which are not well understood and lack even consensus description of their signs and symptoms. Without such consensus, research for precise treatments and ultimately a cure is at a halt. Phenotyping these conditions, that is, systematically characterizing the signs, symptoms and other aspects of these conditions, is thus particularly needed. Computational phentyping can help identify cohorts of patients at scale and identify potential sub-groups, thus generating new hypotheses... Read More

  • Friday, October 26, 2018 - 1:00pm
    CS 2310
    Prof. Andy Pavlo
    CMU

    TITLE
    Make Your Database Dream of Electric Sheep: Designing for Autonomous Operation

    ABSTRACT
    In the last 20 years, researchers and vendors have built advisory tools to assist DBAs in tuning and physical design. Most of this previous work is incomplete because they require humans to make the final decisions about any database changes and are reactionary measures that fix problems after they occur. What is needed for a "self-driving" DBMS are components that are designed for autonomous operation. This will enable new optimizations that are not possible today... Read More

  • Friday, October 26, 2018 -
    1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Fluno Center Auditorium, 601 University Avenue
    Jenna Wiens
    Morris Wellman Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Univ. of Michigan

    Today, we are collecting an immense amount of health data both inside and outside of the hospital. While clinicians are studying ever more data about their patients, they are still ignoring the vast majority of it. Transforming these observational data into actionable knowledge is challenging due to a number of reasons including the presence of confounders, missing context, and complex longitudinal relationships. At the same time, due to the high-stakes nature of healthcare, the field requires tools that are not only accurate, but also interpretable and robust. In this talk, I will present... Read More

  • Friday, October 26, 2018 -
    3:30pm to 4:30pm
    Fluno Center Auditorium, 601 University Avenue
    Peter Hoff
    Professor of Statistical Science, Duke University

    Mixed effects models are used routinely in the biological and social sciences to share information across groups and to account for data dependence. The statistical properties of such models are often quite good on average across groups, but may be poor for any specific group. For example, commonly-used confidence interval procedures may maintain a target coverage rate on average across groups, but have near zero coverage rate for a group that differs substantially from the others. In this talk, we review some basic mixed effects modeling tools, discuss their group-specific properties, and... Read More

  • Monday, October 29, 2018 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    John Criswell
    University of Rochester

    Abstract:

    Commodity operating system kernels are the foundation of our software systems, providing access control, I/O mechanisms, and memory management. However, operating system kernels are vulnerable to a variety of security attacks. Compromising the kernel allows an attacker to render any security protections, provided by the kernel or the applications running on the kernel, useless. Additionally, control of the kernel can be used to launch powerful side-channel attacks against protection systems like Intel SGX.

    In this talk, I will present our virtual instruction set... Read More

  • Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 6:00pm
    CS 1240
    Codecinella and WACM
    Women from Various Madison-Area Companies

    Interviewing can be stressful. Come practice your interview skills with local
    professional women software developers. We are not recruiters, we are not
    representing our companies or hiring. As your peers we hope to give you some
    practice with a technical interview and feedback on your resume. Bring at
    least three copies of a current resume. Volunteers will give you feedback on
    your resume as well as on your interview.

    The spirit of this event is to practice interview skills in a supportive
    environment. Please no recruiters.

    To participate... Read More

  • Repeats every month on October, November, December on the first Tuesday 3 times.
    Tuesday, October 2, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    , Tuesday, November 6, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    , Tuesday, December 4, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    CS 2310
    WACM

    The perfect gathering for all WACM members and Women in Tech to stay in touch, exchange updates about the advances in the relevant field and most of all meet people with similar goals and aspirations. Each cycle we choose a different theme or a topic for the day and use the luncheons as a way to let off some steam and go back to our schedules re energized, fresh and inspired.

    Note: This is no longer a 'bring your own food'. There will be free food ordered by the bi-weekly chairs! Microsoft is generously sponsoring the bi-weekly luncheons this semester.

  • Wednesday, October 17, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    , Wednesday, November 21, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    CS 2310
    WACM

    The perfect gathering for all WACM members and Women in Tech to stay in touch, exchange updates about the advances in the relevant field and most of all meet people with similar goals and aspirations. Each cycle we choose a different theme or a topic for the day and use the luncheons as a way to let off some steam and go back to our schedules re-energized, fresh and inspired.

    Note: This is no longer a 'bring your own food'. There will be free food ordered by the bi-weekly chairs! Microsoft is generously sponsoring the bi-weekly luncheons this semester.

  • Tuesday, October 2, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    , Tuesday, November 6, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    , Tuesday, December 4, 2018 -
    12:15pm to 1:15pm
    CS 2310
    WACM

    The perfect gathering for all WACM members and Women in Tech to stay in touch, exchange updates about the advances in the relevant field and most of all meet people with similar goals and aspirations. Each cycle we choose a different theme or a topic for the day and use the luncheons as a way to let off some steam and go back to our schedules re energized, fresh and inspired.

    Note: This is no longer a 'bring your own food'. There will be free food ordered by the bi-weekly chairs! Microsoft is generously sponsoring the bi-weekly luncheons this semester.

  • Thursday, December 6, 2018 -
    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    CS 1240
    Moshe Y. Vardi
    Rice University

    Mathematical logic was developed in an effort to provide formal foundations
    for mathematics. In this quest, which ultimately failed, logic begat
    computer science, yielding both computers and theoretical computer science.
    But then logic turned out to be a disappointment as foundations for
    computer science, as almost all decision problems in logic are either
    unsolvable or intractable. Starting from the mid 1970s, however, there
    has been a quiet revolution in logic in computer science, and problems that
    are theoretically undecidable or intractable... Read More