Research Groups

Artificial Intelligence
Faculty
Computational Biology
Faculty
Computer Architecture
Faculty

The Vertical Research Group explores computer architecture, VLSI technology and semiconductor manufacturing processes with a vertically integrated approach. Changing technology constraints are leading to a scenario in which current techniques for building processors simply won't work. Emerging applications provide an opportunity to think in a fundamentally different way about how we build processors. We will explore techniques to build high-performance processors that can operate under future technology constraints of reliability and energy efficiency. We explore how emerging applications can be efficiently mapped to future semiconductor substrates. Our end goal is to build proof-of-concept prototype hardware and software systems. The research group is led by Dr. Karu Sankaralingam.

The Wisconsin Multifacet Project seeks to improve the multiprocessor servers that form the computational infrastructure for Internet web servers, databases and other demanding applications. Work focuses on using the transistor bounty provided by Moore's Law to improve multiprocessor performance, cost and fault tolerance, while also making these systems easier to design and program. Dr. Mark Hill and Dr. David Wood lead the project.

Computer Graphics
Faculty
Computer Networks
Faculty

The Wisconsin Wireless and NetworkinG Systems (WiNGS) Laboratory was established at UW-Madison in summer 2005. Research in the WiNGS lab is conducted in the areas of networking and distributed systems, with a primary focus on wireless and mobile networking. Research activities in the lab span a diverse set of activities, ranging from algorithmic design and analysis, and systems building through functional prototypes. Our projects get deployed in real and practical scenarios, sometimes in collaboration with partners who allow us to understand various real constraints, leading in turn to more refined solutions. The activities of this lab are generously supported at different times through funding from government agencies (such as the National Science Foundation) and industrial partners. Dr. Suman Banerjee leads the WiNGS Lab.

Computer Security
Faculty

The Software Assurance Marketplace (SWAMP) is creating a state-of-the-art facility that will serve as an open resource for software developers, assurance tool developers and researchers who wish to perform continuous assurance (CSwA) testing in a safe, secure environment. Funded by the Department of Homeland Security, and directed by academic experts in identity management and high throughput computing, the SWAMP’s mission is to improve the safety and quality of our software ecosystem by creating access to assurance tools and testing, and reporting. UW-Madison computer science professors Miron Livny and Barton Miller are both on the project's leadership team. Livny is SWAMP's principal investigator and serves as its director and chief technology officer. Miller is chief scientist.

Database Systems
Faculty

Welcome to the database systems group of the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. We have been conducting database related research since 1976 and are considered to be one of the best database groups in the country. We work on a variety of research topics including building next-generation database systems, data integration, data science and database theory. Learn more at https://database.cs.wisc.edu/

Human-Computer Interaction
Faculty
Numerical Analysis
Faculty
Optimization
Faculty

The Optimization group at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery is composed of faculty, administrative staff and graduate students from Industrial & Systems Engineering, Computer Sciences, Agricultural & Applied Economics, Mathematics and Electrical & Computer Engineering.  Learn about current optimization projects.

Performance Analysis
Faculty
Programming Languages & Compilers
Faculty
Research Centers
Faculty

The goal of the UW-Madison Center for High Throughput Computing (CHTC) is to enable scientists and engineers to increase their computing throughput by developing, implementing, deploying and evaluating technologies to support High Throughput Computing on large collections of distributed computational resources. The CHTC offers a variety of large-scale computing resources and services for UW-affiliated researchers, delivering many millions of compute hours to hundreds of scientists across campus. The CHTC also serves as the lead institution behind the development of the widely-deployed HTCondor software and the Open Science Grid computing partnership.

Systems Research
Faculty

Dr. Andrea Arpaci-Dusseau and Dr. Remzi Arpaci-Dusseau lead the ADSL. The group is interested in developing new technology in file and storage systems, although it occasionally branches out into more general systems work in operating systems, virtual machines and other related topics. Current work examines new topics in how datacenters should be constructed; see the WISDOM page for more details.

The Paradyn project develops technology that aids tool and application developers in their pursuit of high-performance, scalable, parallel and distributed software. The primary project, Paradyn, leverages a technique called dynamic instrumentation to efficiently obtain performance profiles of unmodified executables. This dynamic binary instrumentation technology is independently available to researchers via the Dyninst API. Other research includes dynamic instrumentation of running operating system kernels (the Kerninst project) and the development of middleware for scalable, efficient, robust applications in the MRNet multicast/reduction network.

The Sonar research group studies the interaction of operating systems and hardware, including devices and new processor/memory technologies.

The Wisconsin Institute on Software-defined Datacenters in Madison (WISDoM) held a kickoff workshop in November 2012. A second workshop is scheduled for spring 2014. The Institute brings together an eclectic group of researchers from the Department of Computer Sciences in storage, networks and security.

Theoretical Computer Science
Faculty

The Theory of Computing Group currently includes four full-time faculty and numerous graduate students.  Current areas of interest include:

  • Algorithms, including approximation algorithms for combinatorial and stochastic optimization, algorithms in number theory, algebra, and biology;
  • Computational complexity, especially structural complexity and the role of randomness in computation;
  • Algorithmic game theory;
  • Emerging paradigms, especially quantum computing;
  • Cryptography;
  • Learning theory.