Distinguished Lecture in Computer Graphics - Human Movement: Biomechanics and Simulation

Thursday, April 14, 2016 -
4:00pm to 5:00pm
Computer Sciences 1240

Speaker Name: 

Dinesh K. Pai

Speaker Institution: 

University of British Columbia

Cookies: 

Yes

Cookies Location: 

Computer Sciences 1240

Description: 

HUMAN MOVEMENT: BIOMECHANICS AND SIMULATION

Abstract:

Our goal is to develop realistic computational models of the human
biomechanical system, that can make useful predictions of how the
human body really works. Such models have a wide range of
applications, ranging from computer graphics to human health. Despite
the long history of research in this area, current models have many
surprising shortcomings. I will first outline some fundamental
problems and their solutions, including the proper accounting of
muscle mass and how muscles produce force.

In the second part I will discuss numerical methods for simulating
large scale biomechanical systems. Biological soft tissues are usually
simulated using a Lagrangian discretization, following the standard
practice in solid mechanics. However, realistic systems have many
muscles and tendons that are highly constrained by each other and by
connective tissues. Dealing with these constraints pose significant
challenges for the traditional approach. Instead, I will advocate the
use of Eulerian (and Eulerian-on-Lagrangian) discretizations. I will
demonstrate recent results using this approach in simulating the
tendon networks of the hand, human skin, and multiple muscles in
contact.

Speaker Bio:

Dinesh K. Pai is a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the
Department of Computer Science at the University of British Columbia.
He is also a member of the Institute of Applied Mathematics, the ICORD
International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, and the Brain
Research Centre. He has been a Professor at Rutgers University, and a
visiting professor at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute,
New York University's Center for Neural Science, the University of
Siena (as Santa Chiara Chair in Cognitive Science), and the Collège de
France, Paris (elected Professeur Invité). He received his Ph.D. from
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and his B.Tech. degree from the Indian
Institute of Technology, Madras. His current research is focused on
sensorimotor computation in neurobiology, computer graphics, haptics,
and robotics. See http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~pai/ for more information.